Spotburger with Cheese

A few weeks ago I found myself in Carpintería, California.

Since The Spot appeared to be a local institution, lunch there would mr the most blogworthy, I reckoned. 


It was a decently cooked cheeseburger served with romaine lettuce, a slice of tomato, ketchup and mustard. I believe there were pickles in the sandwich, of the sour variety. The patty had a nice char on it. The bun was toasted perfectly. 


They had a minimalist condiment bar and I availed myself of sport peppers, the provenance of the name both eluded me then and now. 

Flan con Chocolate 

The proprietor called this flan something else, but it was flan with a chocolate crust.


It was only 20 pesos and it was good. I like flan with the traditional caramel sauce, but this was acceptable. I didn’t know what it was before I ordered it.


This stall can be found in the food court known as Mercado San Camilto on the north side of Plaza Garibaldi in Mexico City. 

Pozole

Pozole is a stew made with hominy and meat- nowadays, pork. But the meat in pozole used to come from a primate, not an artiodactyl.

Wikipedia reports: 

Pozole was mentioned in Fray Bernardino de Sahagún’s General History of the Things of New Spain (c. 1500). Since maize was a sacred plant for the Aztecs and other inhabitants of Mesoamerica, pozole was made to be consumed on special occasions. The conjunction of maize (usually whole hominy kernels) and meat in a single dish is of particular interest to scholars, because the ancient Americans(which?) believed the gods made humans out of masa (cornmeal dough).


According to research by the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (National Institute of Anthropology and History) and the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, on these special occasions, the meat used in the pozole was human.[14] After the prisoners were killed by having their hearts torn out in a ritual sacrifice, the rest of the body was chopped and cooked with maize, and the resulting meal was shared among the whole community as an act of religious communion. After the Conquest, when cannibalism was banned, pork became the staple meat as it “tasted very similar” [to human flesh], according to a Spanish priest.[14]

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pozole

As one can see, the bowl contains hominy, shredded pork, cabbage and sliced radishes. 


The sauces were all tasty. I really like the avocado salsa, which was surprisingly spicy.


While pozole was interesting I didn’t love it. It wasn’t bad, but there are far more delicious Mexican dishes. But for historical purposes, I had to try it. 

Pollo Tai Fideos 

I like the idea of fusion restaurants. Sometimes fusion can be amazing. I want to support establishments which do something different, however sometimes such efforts fail as was the case with these Thai noodles with chicken.

As I was strolling through Zona Roma in Mexico City a couple of weeks ago my curiosity was piqued by an interesting menu at a small cafe.


I deduced that nueces de la India were cashews. This bowl of noodles with soy sauce, cilantro, chilies and ginger could have been good. I couldn’t detect any noticeable Mexican influence in this dish as cilantro and chilies are used in both Thai and Mexican cookingz 

The bell peppers were mushy and I only found one sliver of a chili and two cashews. 

The menu looked good and I wanted to love the food.


The ginger soda was good.

Bistec Plano 

I can’t remember the exact name of this steak. It was wide, but very thin. The meat was a little fatty and not the most tender beef I’ve ever had, but it was meaty and savory enough to please me. Not good enough for me to close my eyes, but it was only about seven dollars, whatever that isvin pesos. It was two weeks ago and I’ve already forgotten the prices of things in Ciudad de México. 

It was a steak, roasted potatoes, a tostada covered with refríed beans and green beans. 

After I added sauces it looked like the above. 

A bowl of consommé with some beans was my first course. 


The food court I mentioned is called El Mercado San Camilton, located on the north side of Plaza Garibaldi. 

Churro Relleno con Dulce de Leche

On my way to Trotsky’s house I happened by this hipster food court in the neighborhood of Coyoacán in Mexico City.


I was still a little sleepy so I reckoned a churro and a latte would energize me.

And a churro stuffed with dulce de leche?

Even more energy.


It was very good but I would felt gluttonous having another, even if I was on vacation. 

Torta al Pastor

I love that mutton used in tacos al pastor, so  one morning on my recent trip to Mexico City when I was on my way to Chapultepec Castle I stopped by this sandwich stall near Plaza Garibaldi. 


Instead of getting the meat in the little tacos I opted for the sandwich version. The bun is  grilled and the meat is topped with pico de gallo. 


It was delicious and it wasn’t so massive that it slowed me down. The Mexican Coke made it a nutritious breakfast.