Fala-Full Sandwich

I returned yet another time to the Veggie Grill after the gym on a Friday night. The menu has begun to bore me as I’ve tried most or all of the mock meat dishes.

So I ordered the falafel sandwich. Tabbouleh was served on the side and in the pita bread along with the chickpea fritters was pepperoncini, cilantro and skchug sauce, which is described by Wikipedia as a Yemeni hot sauce.

It was good and I will return to try their mock turkey dinner.

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Mediterranean Plate

A few weeks ago I had a serious hankering for hummus. On January 29th the Getty Center and the Getty Villa were free so I went to the villa. 


There was pita bread, a scoop of hummus, tabbouli, a pile of olives and about 200 grams of marinated feta cheese.

That’s a lot of cheese. I liked all of it, but there wasn’t enough bread for all of that cheese. 

I was very happy afterwards.


Not only are the Greek and Roman artifacts awesome, but the grounds of the Getty Villa are likewise beautiful. 

Chicken Kebab

Sometime before Christmas I met one of my brothers in Los Angeles and we went out. Before we went to the bar we stopped off at this halal kebab restaurant. 


It was reasonably priced and it was served with a good amount of hummus. The chicken and hummus were nice and garlicky. 


As one can see, the kebab was served with hummus, puts bread and a small side salad.

Moroccan Chicken Pizza

Yeah I know it might sound abominable, especially with the addition of delicious bacon, which I’m pretty sure is not used often in Moroccan cuisine, but this was pretty good. 


Besides the Moroccan spiced chicken meatballs, the aforementioned bacon, arugula, sour cream and a sweet tomato ragout, the dukkah sold me. 

According to Wikipedia, dukkah is:

Duqqa,[spelling 1] du’ah, do’a,[1] or dukkah (Egyptian Arabic: دقة‎‎ pronounced [ˈdæʔʔæ]) is an Egyptian condiment consisting of a mixture of herbs, nuts (usually hazelnut), and spices. It is typically used as a dip with bread[2] or fresh vegetables for an hors d’œuvre.[3] Pre-made versions of duqqa can be bought in the spice markets of Cairo, with the simplest version being crushed mint, salt and pepper which are sold in paper cones.[4] The packaged variety is found in markets that is composed of parched wheat flour mixed with cumin and caraway.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duqqa


The combination of flavors and textures worked well together. I also had garlic bread, which was strangely sweet. 


I’ve been slacking on blogging. I had this at Skinny Pizza two weeks ago. 

Here’s a photo of a mosque near my apartment. 

Chicken Shwarma

A week or so ago, I went to Pita & Olive, the Arabic/Israeli stall at the Pasar Bella food court in Suntec City.


I ate under a red light at the soi-disant hipster food court, hence the color. On the big plate was a salad comprised of diced cucumber, black olives and tomato. There was a big mound of hummus topped with olive oil, paprika and whole chickpeas. Of course, the roasted chicken Shwarma was there too. 

Having to use a plastic fork vexed me. Plastic forks are bullshit.


It was very good and it filled me up.