Stuck in Singapore 

Not a restaurant, but shameless advertisement of a novel I’ve written. 

I think it’s pretty good. The Kindle version is only $3.

It is a novel, but there are plenty of descriptions of Asian food. It’s less Eat, Pray, Love and more Bourne with bumbling people. 

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Fried Oyster and Shrimp Po’ Boy 

Last week I met up with a former student of mine from China who is studying in Singapore. 

I took him to the Grand Central Market, which is, to the best of my knowledge, the best food court in Los Angeles.


The bread was crunchy and the pickled cabbage and the aioli provided a sweet and sour contrast to the crunchy, salty oysters and meaty shrimp. 

The house fries with rouille were very good. 


Prawn is the name of the seafood stall. I think it changed its name or it replaced another seafood stall called The Bomb, or something like that. 


The sandwich was delicious, but so rich and greasy I could not finish it.

In N Out Cheeseburger

At one time in my life I thought In N Out was the Alpha and Omega of fast food burgers. At one time I guess it has. But the burger Renaissance which began about a decade ago, has left In N Out behind. Don’t get me wrong- it’s much better than Wendy’s or McDonald’s or Burger King. 

But Five Guys is better. 


The bun is light, similar to challah or a brioche. It was not greasy at all and I could have easily eaten two of them. Vegetables are an afterthought and the thin leaf of lettuce was sad. 


The fries were too dry. 

It’s over between me and In N Out. I’ve moved on to better cheeseburgers. 

Papusa con Puerco

This might have been the second time since I’ve had a papusa. A papusa is a flat spongy bread filled with vegetables or meat.

Originally from El Salvador, I’ve been noticing papuserias here and there.


I ordered the papusa with pork and cheese. It was served with salsa and guacamole.

I liked it.

The cucumber mint lemonade was very good.


I went to Manchester, a city near Long Beach for a job interview. 

I saw this odd building across the street from the park where the farmers’ market was located.

Spicy Dry Noodles (干辣面)

I lived for a total of seven years in Asia: one and a half years in Taiwan and five and a half in Singapore. 

Thus, I sometimes crave real Chinese food. Real I mean as Chinese food prepared traditionally by Chinese people for Chinese people. 


The serving was much bigger I would have received in Singapore. I liked the deboned pork ribs, the Sichuan pepper and the pickled vegetables. Except for the huge portion it tasted authentic, like a dish I could get at a stall in the People’s Park Complex in Singapore’s Chinatown. 


I went with my brother. Afterwards we walked over the Pershing Square and I ordered some petits fours at a chocolatier.


The petits fours were very rich and I managed to eat two, a bitter chocolate and a rose lemon flavor.